Global QuickSearch:   Number of matching entries: 0

Search Settings

    BibTeX-Key Author / Editor / Organization Title Year Journal / Proceedings / Book BibTeX type Keywords
    Huynh2015 Huynh, V.T.; Dunbabin, M. & Smith, R.N. Predictive Motion Planning for AUVs subject to strong time-varying currents and forecasting uncertainties 2015, submitted Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Huynh2015,
      author = {Van T. Huynh and Matthew Dunbabin and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Predictive Motion Planning for AUVs subject to strong time-varying currents and forecasting uncertainties},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2015, submitted},
      note = {Submitted}
    }
    					
    Kularatne2015 Kularatne, D.; Hsieh, M.A. & Smith, R.N. Adaptive Planning and Tracking of Ocean Fronts with an Autonomous Aquatic Vehicle 2015, submitted Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Kularatne2015,
      author = {Dhanushka Kularatne and M. Ani Hsieh and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Adaptive Planning and Tracking of Ocean Fronts with an Autonomous Aquatic Vehicle},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2015, submitted},
      note = {Submitted}
    }
    					
    Stuntz2015 Stuntz, A.; Zhang, Y.; Hollinger, G.A. & Smith, R.N. Experimental analysis of receding horizon planning for marine monitoring 2015, submitted Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings
    Abstract: Autonomous Surface Vehicles (ASV's) are becoming more capable. Often cited as poor long term data collection platforms they are now being optimized to have ranges of 500 or more miles and are being more often considered as long term data collecters in the ocean. Being more capable than a oceanic glider they are ideal for long term sampling in the ocean. Being relatively inexpensive they are able to travel to places that larger boats or more expensive systems are not able to travel to easily. Planning paths for these ASV's is becoming more pertinent as ASV's become more able to travel longer distances and collect more data. This paper compares widely used path planning models for their effectiveness at collecting useable data in an aquatic environment.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Stuntz2015,
      author = {Andrew Stuntz and Yawei Zhang and Geoffrey A. Hollinger and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Experimental analysis of receding horizon planning for marine monitoring},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2015, submitted}
    }
    					
    Ferrari2014 Ferrari, R.; McKinnon, D.; He, H.; Corke, P.; Smith, R.N.; Mumby, P.J. & Upcroft, B. Beyond the Chain Age: Underwater Structural Complexity from Video Footage 2014, submitted Methods in Ecology and Evolution   article bio-erosion, computer vision, coral growth, ecosystem health assessment, rugosity, structural complexity, photogrammetry, monocular camera.
    Abstract: 1. Habitat structural complexity influences key ecological processes, which influence ecosystem biodiversity and resilience. Previous attempts to quantify complexity of underwater habitats have proven to be labour intensive and fundamentally limited in scale and/or resolution. 2. We propose a novel methodology (Underwater in three dimensions - U3D) to accurately compute structural complexity with reduced effort, and without invasive techniques; an application to coral reefs is used here as an example. 3. U3D involves a set of innovative, multi-view, image-processing algorithms, which provide rapid and accurate three-dimensional reconstruction (up to scale) from footage taken with a monocular video or still camera. 4. U3D quantifies habitat structural complexity at multiple spatial scales, e.g., from newly settled corals to entire coral reefs. Here, we demonstrate U3D with the three-dimensional reconstruction of a coral colony (Acropora spp.) to < 1 mm accuracy over 90% of its surface area, and an accurate computation of the structural complexity of a fore reef region with an area of > 400 m2. 5. U3D is flexible, providing the ability to utilize any existing video sequences taken from any type of underwater camera from any reef habitat or location. Offering an infinite array of possibilities for future research by producing a cost-effective and automated method of quantifying structural complexity, growth and bioerosion, from both new and historical video surveys of underwater habitats, such as coral reefs.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Ferrari2014,
      author = {Renata Ferrari and David McKinnon and Hu He and Peter Corke and Ryan N. Smith and Peter J. Mumby and Ben Upcroft},
      title = {Beyond the Chain Age: Underwater Structural Complexity from Video Footage},
      journal = {Methods in Ecology and Evolution},
      year = {2014, submitted}
    }
    					
    Huynh2014 Huynh, V.T.; Dunbabin, M. & Smith, R.N. Convergence-Guaranteed Time-Varying RRT Path Planning for Profiling Floats in 4-Dimensional Flow 2014, accepted Proceedings of the Australiasian Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Huynh2014,
      author = {Van T. Huynh and Matthew Dunbabin and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Convergence-Guaranteed Time-Varying RRT Path Planning for Profiling Floats in 4-Dimensional Flow},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the Australiasian Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2014, accepted}
    }
    					
    Ngo2014 Ngo, P.; Ogle, J.; Das, J.; Thomas, J.; Anderson, W. & Smith, R.N. Predicting the Speed of a Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle from Wave Model Data 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems   inproceedings wave glider, speed prediction, gaussian process regression, autonomous vehicle, dynamics, kinematics
    Abstract: A key component of robotic path planning is ensuring that one can reliably navigate a vehicle to a desired location. In addition, when the features of interest are dynamic and move with oceanic currents, vehicle speed plays an im- portant role in the planning exercise to ensure that vehicles are in the right place at the right time. Aquatic robot design is moving towards utilizing the environment for propulsion rather than traditional motors and propellers. These new vehicles are able to realize significantly increased endurance, however the mission planning problem, in turn, becomes more difficult as the vehicle velocity is not directly controllable. In this paper, we examine Gaussian process models applied to existing wave model data to predict the behavior, i.e., velocity, of a Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle. Using training data from an on-board sensor and forecasting with the WAVEWATCH III model, our probabilistic regression models created an effective method for forecasting WG velocity.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Ngo2014,
      author = {Phillip Ngo and Jonathan Ogle and Jnaneshwar Das and Jesse Thomas and Will Anderson and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Predicting the Speed of a Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle from Wave Model Data},
      booktitle = {IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems},
      year = {2014}
    }
    					
    Ogle2014 Ogle, J.; Naglak, J.; Blue-Eyes, I.; Miller, C.; Baumbach, A.; Prentis, P. & Smith, R.N. Design and Development of a Sampling Platform to Study Long Distance Seed Dispersal 2014 MTS/IEEE Oceans   inproceedings long distance dispersal, ocean model, persistent monitoring, ocean sampling, low-cost auv
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Ogle2014,
      author = {Jonathan Ogle and John Naglak and Isaac Blue-Eyes and Collin Miller and Aleph Baumbach and Peter Prentis and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Design and Development of a Sampling Platform to Study Long Distance Seed Dispersal},
      booktitle = {MTS/IEEE Oceans},
      year = {2014}
    }
    					
    Smith2014 Smith, R.N.; Cooksey, P.; Py, F.; Sukhatme, G.S. & Rajan, K. Adaptive Path Planning for Tracking Ocean Fronts with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle 2014 International Symposium on Experimental Robotics , pp. 1 - 15   inproceedings adaptive path planning, t-rex, ros, ecomapper, ocean front, auv, collaborative, front tracking
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2014,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Philip Cooksey and Frederic Py and Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Kanna Rajan},
      title = {Adaptive Path Planning for Tracking Ocean Fronts with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle},
      booktitle = {International Symposium on Experimental Robotics},
      year = {2014},
      pages = {1 -- 15}
    }
    					
    Al-Sabban2013 Al-Sabban, W.H.; Gonzalez, L.F. & Smith, R.N. Wind-Energy based Path Planning for Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes 2013 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings markov decision processes, wind-based planning, unmanned aerial vehicle, gaussian processes, energy optimization
    Abstract: Exploiting wind-energy is one possible way to extend flight duration for Unmanned Arial Vehicles. Wind-energy can also be used to minimise energy consumption for a planned path. In this paper, we consider uncertain time-varying wind fields and plan a path through them. A Gaussian distribution is used to determine uncertainty in the Time-varying wind fields. We use Markov Decision Process to plan a path based upon the uncertainty of Gaussian distribution. Simulation results that compare the direct line of flight between start and target point and our planned path for energy consumption and time of travel are presented. The result is a robust path using the most visited cell while sampling the Gaussian distribution of the wind field in each cell.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Al-Sabban2013,
      author = {Wesam H. Al-Sabban and Luis F. Gonzalez and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Wind-Energy based Path Planning for Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Al-Sabban2013a Al-Sabban, W.; Das, J. & Smith, R.N. Persistent robot tasking for environmental monitoring through crowd-sourcing 2013 Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE OCEANS   inproceedings
    Abstract: Persistent monitoring of the ocean is not optimally accomplished by repeatedly executing a fixed path in a fixed location. The ocean is dynamic, and so should the executed paths to monitor and observe it. An open question merging autonomy and optimal sampling is how and when to alter a path/decision, yet achieve desired science objectives. Addi- tionally, many marine robotic deployments can last multiple weeks to months; making it very difficult for individuals to continuously monitor and retask them as needed. This problem becomes increasingly more complex when multiple platforms are operating simultaneously. There is a need for monitoring and adaptation of the robotic fleet via teams of scientists working in shifts; crowds are ideal for this task. In this paper, we present a novel application of crowd-sourcing to extend the autonomy of persistent-monitoring vehicles to enable non- repetitious sampling over long periods of time. We present a framework that enables the control of a marine robot by anybody with an internet-enabled device. Voters are provided current vehicle location, gathered science data and predicted ocean features through the associated decision support system. Results are included from a simulated implementation of our system on a Wave Glider operating in Monterey Bay with the science objective to maximize the sum of observed nitrate values collected.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Al-Sabban2013a,
      author = {Al-Sabban, W. and Jnaneshwar Das and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Persistent robot tasking for environmental monitoring through crowd-sourcing},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE OCEANS},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Chyba2013 Chyba, M.; Marriott, J.; Grammatico, S.; Huynh, V.T. & Smith, R.N. Reducing Actuator Switchings for Motion Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles 2013 Proceedings of the American Control Conference   inproceedings actuator switching, optimal control, autonomous underwater vehicles, piece-wise constant strategy
    Abstract: A priority when designing control strategies for autonomous underwater vehicles is to emphasize their cost of implementation on a real vehicle and at the same time to minimize a prescribed criterion such as time, energy, payload or combination of those. Indeed, the major issue is that due to the vehicles' design and the actuation modes usually under consideration for underwater platforms the number of actuator switchings must be kept to a small value to ensure feasibility and precision. This constraint is typically not verified by optimal trajectories which might not even be piecewise constants. Our goal is to provide a feasible trajectory that minimizes the number of switchings while maintaining some qualities of the desired trajectory, such as optimality with respect to a given criterion. The one-sided Lipschitz constant is used to derive theoretical estimates. The theory is illustrated on two examples, one is a fully actuated underwater vehicle capable of motion in six degrees-of-freedom and one is minimally actuated with control motions constrained to the vertical plane.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2013,
      author = {Monique Chyba and John Marriott and Sergio Grammatico and Van T. Huynh and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Reducing Actuator Switchings for Motion Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the American Control Conference},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Hernandez2013 Hernandez, D.; Smith, R.N.; Fernandez, E.; Isern, J.; Cabrera, J.; Dominguez, A. & Prieto, V. Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies 2013 Fourteenth International Conference on Computer Aided Systems Theory, Workshop on Marine Robotics and Applications   inproceedings autonomous glider, mesoscale eddy, path planning, adaptive sampling
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Hernandez2013,
      author = {Daniel Hernandez and Ryan N. Smith and Enrique Fernandez and Josep Isern and Jorge Cabrera and Antonio Dominguez and Victor Prieto},
      title = {Glider Path-Planning for Optimal Sampling of Mesoscale Eddies},
      booktitle = {Fourteenth International Conference on Computer Aided Systems Theory, Workshop on Marine Robotics and Applications},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Ngo2013 Ngo, P.; Al-Sabban, W.; Thomas, J.; Anderson, W.; Das, J. & Smith, R.N. An Analysis of Regression Models for Predicting the Speed of a Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle 2013 Australasian Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings wave glider, speed prediction, gaussian process regression, autonomous vehicle, dynamics, kinematics
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Ngo2013,
      author = {Phillip Ngo and Wesam Al-Sabban and Jesse Thomas and Will Anderson and Jnashewar Das and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {An Analysis of Regression Models for Predicting the Speed of a Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle},
      booktitle = {Australasian Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Smith2012b Smith, R.N. & Huynh, V.T. Controlling Buoyancy-Driven Profiling Floats for Applications in Ocean Observation 2013 IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering
    Vol. PP (99) , pp. 1 - 16  
    article autonomous underwater vehicles, minimal actuation, profiling floats, model predictive control
    Abstract: Establishing a persistent presence in the ocean with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle capable of observing temporal variability of large-scale ocean processes requires a unique sensor platform. In this paper, we examine the utility of vehicles that can only control their depth in the water column for such extended deployments. We present a strategy that utilizes ocean model predictions to facilitate a basic level of autonomy and enabling general control for these profiling floats. The proposed method is based on experimentally-validated techniques for utilising ocean current models to control autonomous gliders. With the appropriate vertical actuation, and utilising spatiotemporal variations in water speed and direction, we show that general controllability results can be met. First, we apply an A* planner to a local controllability map generated from predictions of ocean currents. This computes a path between start and goal waypoints that has the highest likelihood of successful execution. A computed depth plan is generated with a model predictive controller, and selects the depths for the vehicle so that ambient currents guide it toward the goal. Mission constraints are included to simulate and motivate a practical data collection mission. Results are presented in simulation for a mission off the coast of Los Angeles, CA USA, that show encouraging results in the ability of a drifting vehicle to reach a desired location.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2012b,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Van T. Huynh},
      title = {Controlling Buoyancy-Driven Profiling Floats for Applications in Ocean Observation},
      journal = {IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering},
      year = {2013},
      volume = {PP},
      number = {99},
      pages = {1 -- 16},
      doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JOE.2013.2261895}
    }
    					
    Smith2013 Smith, R.N.; Kelly, J.; Nazarzadeh, K. & Sukhatme, G.S. An Investigation on the Accuracy of Regional Ocean Models Through Field Trials 2013 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings ocean models, field validation, autonomous underwater vehicles, mission planning
    Abstract: Recent efforts in mission planning for underwater vehicles have utilised predictive models to aid in navigation, optimal path planning and drive opportunistic sampling. Al- though these models provide information at a unprecedented resolutions and have proven to increase accuracy and effective- ness in multiple campaigns, most are deterministic in nature. Thus, predictions cannot be incorporated into probabilistic planning frameworks, nor do they provide any metric on the variance or confidence of the output variables. In this paper, we provide an initial investigation into determining the confidence of ocean model predictions based on the results of multiple field deployments of two autonomous underwater vehicles. For multiple missions conducted over a two-month period in 2011, we compare actual vehicle executions to simulations of the same missions through the Regional Ocean Modeling System in an ocean region off the coast of southern California. This comparison provides a qualitative analysis of the current veloc- ity predictions for areas within the selected deployment region. Ultimately, we present a spatial heat-map of the correlation between the ocean model predictions and the actual mission executions. Knowing where the model provides unreliable predictions can be incorporated into planners to increase the utility and application of the deterministic estimations.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2013,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jonathan Kelly and Kimia Nazarzadeh and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {An Investigation on the Accuracy of Regional Ocean Models Through Field Trials},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2013}
    }
    					
    Al-Sabban2012a Al-Sabban, W.H.; Gonzalez, L.F. & Smith, R.N. Extending Persistent Monitoring by Combining Ocean Models and Markov Decision Processes 2012 Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans   inproceedings markov decision processes, autonomous underwater vehicles, ocean model, persistent monitoring, path planning
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Al-Sabban2012a,
      author = {Wesam H. Al-Sabban and Luis F. Gonzalez and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Extending Persistent Monitoring by Combining Ocean Models and Markov Decision Processes},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    He2012 He, H.; Ferrari, R.; McKinnon, D.; Roff, G.A.; Smith, R.N.; Mumby, P.J. & Upcroft, B. Measuring Reef Complexity and Rugosity from Monocular Video Bathymetric Reconstruction 2012 Proceedings of the 12$^th$ International Coral Reef Symposium   inproceedings structural complexity, rugosity, monocular video, online calibration, reconstruction
    Abstract: Topographic structural complexity of a reef is highly correlated to coral growth rates, coral cover and overall levels of biodiversity, and is therefore integral in determining ecological processes. Modeling these processes commonly includes measures of rugosity obtained from a wide range of different survey techniques that often fail to capture rugosity at different spatial scales. Here we show that accurate estimates of rugosity can be obtained from video footage captured using underwater video cameras (i.e., monocular video). To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we compared the results to in situ measurements of a 2m x 20m area of forereef from Glovers Reef atoll in Belize. Sequential pairs of images were used to compute fine scale bathymetric reconstructions of the reef substrate from which precise measurements of rugosity and reef topographic structural complexity can be derived across multiple spatial scales. To achieve accurate bathymetric reconstructions from uncalibrated monocular video, the position of the camera for each image in the video sequence and the intrinsic parameters (e.g., focal length) must be computed simultaneously. We show that these parameters can be often determined when the data exhibits parallax-type motion, and that rugosity and reef complexity can be accurately computed from existing video sequences taken from any type of underwater camera from any reef habitat or location. This technique provides an infinite array of possibilities for future coral reef research by providing a cost-effective and automated method of determining structural complexity and rugosity in both new and historical video surveys of coral reefs.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{He2012,
      author = {Hu He and Renata Ferrari and David McKinnon and George A. Roff and Ryan N. Smith and Peter J. Mumby and Ben Upcroft},
      title = {Measuring Reef Complexity and Rugosity from Monocular Video Bathymetric Reconstruction},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 12$^th$ International Coral Reef Symposium},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    Huynh2012 Huynh, V.T.; Smith, R.N.; Kwok, N.M. & Katupitiya, J. A nonlinear PI and backstepping based controller for tractor-steerable trailer influenced by slip 2012 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings agricultural robotics, automated farming, nonlinear control, robust control, tractor-trailer steering, slip
    Abstract: Autonomous guidance of agricultural vehiclesis vital as mechanized farming production becomes more prevalent. It is crucial that tractor-trailers are guided with accuracy in both lateral and longitudinal directions, whilst being affected by large disturbance forces, or slips, owing to uncertain and undulating terrain. Successful research has been concentrated on trajectory control which can provide longitudinal and lateral accuracy if the vehicle moves without sliding, and the trailer is passive. In this paper, the problem of robust trajectory tracking along straight and circular paths of a tractor-steerable trailer is addressed. By utilizing a robust combination of backstepping and nonlinear PI control, a robust, nonlinear controller is proposed. For vehicles subjected to sliding, the proposed controller makes the lateral deviations and the orientation errors of the tractor and trailer converge to a neighborhood near the origin. Simulation results are presented to illustrate that the suggested controller ensures precise trajectory tracking in the presence of slip.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Huynh2012,
      author = {Van T. Huynh and Ryan N. Smith and Ngai Ming Kwok and Jayantha Katupitiya},
      title = {A nonlinear PI and backstepping based controller for tractor-steerable trailer influenced by slip},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    McKinnon2012 McKinnon, D.; Smith, R.N. & Upcroft, B. A Semi-Local Method for Iterative Depth-Map Refinement 2012 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings 3d reconstruction, semi-local depth map refinement, image processing, robotic vision
    Abstract: We present an iterative hierarchical algorithm for multi-view stereo. The algorithm attempts to utilise as much contextual information as is available to compute highly accurate and robust depth maps. There are three novel aspects to the approach: 1) firstly we incrementally improve the depth fidelity as the algorithm progresses through the image pyramid; 2) secondly we show how to incorporate visual hull information (when available) to constrain depth searches; and 3) we show how to simultaneously enforce the consistency of the depth-map by continual comparison with neighbouring depth-maps. We show that this approach produces highly accurate depth-maps and, since it is essentially a local method, is both extremely fast and simple to implement.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{McKinnon2012,
      author = {David McKinnon and Ryan N. Smith and Ben Upcroft},
      title = {A Semi-Local Method for Iterative Depth-Map Refinement},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    Smith2012 Smith, R.N.; Kelly, J. & Sukhatme, G.S. Towards Improving Mission Execution for Autonomous Gliders with an Ocean Model and Kalman Filter 2012 Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings kalman filter, ocean engineering, oceanography, physical oceanography, environmental monitoring, harmful algal blooms, autonomous robotics, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean modeling
    Abstract: In this paper, we examine the use of a Kalman filter to aid in the mission planning process for autonomous gliders. Given a set of waypoints defining the planned mission and a prediction of the ocean currents from a regional ocean model, we present an approach to determine the best, constant, time interval at which the glider should surface to maintain a prescribed tracking error, and minimizing time on the ocean surface. We assume basic parameters for the execution of a given mission, and provide the results of the Kalman filter mission planning approach. These results are compared with previous executions of the given mission scenario.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2012,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jonathan Kelly and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Towards Improving Mission Execution for Autonomous Gliders with an Ocean Model and Kalman Filter},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    Smith2012a Smith, R.N. & Huynh, V.T. Controlling Minimally-Actuated Vehicles for Applications in Ocean Observation 2012 Proceedings of the IFAC Workshop on Navigation, Guidance and Control of Underwater Vehicles   inproceedings autonomous control, path planning, marine systems, control algorithms, profiling floats
    Abstract: Establishing a persistent presence in the ocean with an AUV to observe temporal variability of large-scale ocean processes requires a unique sensor platform. In this paper, we propose a strategy that utilizes ocean model predictions to increase the autonomy and control of Lagrangian or profiling floats for precisely this purpose. An A* planner is applied to a local controllability map generated from predictions of ocean currents to compute a path between prescribed waypoints that has the highest likelihood of successful execution. The control to follow the planned path is computed by use of a model predictive controller. This controller is designed to select the best depth for the vehicle to exploit ambient currents to reach the goal waypoint. Mission constraints are employed to simulate a practical data collection mission. Results are presented in simulation for a mission off the coast of Los Angeles, CA USA, and show surprising results in the ability of a Lagrangian float to reach a desired location.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2012a,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Van T. Huynh},
      title = {Controlling Minimally-Actuated Vehicles for Applications in Ocean Observation},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IFAC Workshop on Navigation, Guidance and Control of Underwater Vehicles},
      year = {2012}
    }
    					
    McKinnon2011 McKinnon, D.; He, H.; Upcroft, B. & Smith, R.N. Towards Automated and In-Situ, Near-Real Time 3-D Reconstruction of Coral Reef Environments 2011 Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans '11 - Kona   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, 3-d reconstruction, computer vision
    Abstract: Coral reefs are biologically complex ecosystems that support a wide variety of marine organisms. These are fragile communities under enormous threat from natural and human-based influences. Properly assessing and measuring the growth and health of reefs is essential to understanding impacts of ocean acidification, coastal urbanisation and global warming. In this paper, we present an innovative 3-D reconstruction technique based on visual imagery as a non-intrusive, repeat- able, in situ method for estimating physical parameters, such as surface area and volume for efficient assessment of long- term variability. The reconstruction algorithms are presented, and benchmarked using an existing data set. We validate the technique underwater, utilising a commercial-off-the-shelf camera and a piece of staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. The resulting reconstruction is compared with a laser scan of the coral piece for assessment and validation. The comparison shows that 77% of the pixels in the reconstruction are within 0.3 mm of the ground truth laser scan. Reconstruction results from an unknown video camera are also presented as a segue to future applications of this research.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{McKinnon2011,
      author = {David McKinnon and Hu He and Ben Upcroft and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Towards Automated and In-Situ, Near-Real Time 3-D Reconstruction of Coral Reef Environments},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans '11 - Kona},
      year = {2011}
    }
    					
    Smith2011 Smith, R.N.; Schwager, M.; Smith, S.L.; Rus, D. & Sukhatme, G.S. Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic Ocean Processes 2011 Proceedings of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation , pp. 1517 - 1524   inproceedings ocean engineering, oceanography, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, environmental monitoring, harmful algal blooms, autonomous robotics
    Abstract: Ocean processes are dynamic and complex events that occur on multiple different spatial and temporal scales. To obtain a synoptic view of such events, ocean scientists focus on the collection of long-term time series data sets. Generally, these time series measurements are continually provided in real or near-real time by fixed sensors, e.g., buoys and moorings. In recent years, an increase in the utilization of mobile sensor platforms, e.g., Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, has been seen to enable dynamic acquisition of time series data sets. However, these mobile assets are not utilized to their full capabilities, generally only performing repeated transects or user-defined patrolling loops. Here, we provide an extension to repeated patrolling of a designated area. Our algorithms provide the ability to adapt a standard mission to increase information gain in areas of greater scientific interest. By implementing a velocity control optimization along the predefined path, we are able to increase or decrease spatiotemporal sampling resolution to satisfy the sampling requirements necessary to properly resolve an oceanic phenomenon. We present a path planning algorithm that defines a sampling path, which is optimized for repeatability. This is followed by the derevation of a velocity controller that defines how the vehicle traverses the given path. The application of these tools is motivated by an ongoing research effort to understand the oceanic region off the coast of Los Angeles, California. The computed paths are implemented with the computed velocities onto autonomous vehicles for data collection during sea trials. Results from this data collection are presented and compared for analysis of the proposed technique.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2011,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Mac Schwager and Stephen L. Smith and Daniela Rus and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic Ocean Processes},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2011},
      pages = {1517 - 1524},
      doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICRA.2011.5979583}
    }
    					
    Smith2011a Smith, R.N.; Schwager, M.; Smith, S.L.; Jones, B.H.; Rus, D. & Sukhatme, G.S. Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Adapting Sampling Resolution 2011 Journal of Field Robotics
    Vol. 28 (5) , pp. 714 - 741  
    article autonomous robotics, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering, oceanography, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, control theory, harmful algal blooms, environmental monitoring
    Abstract: Ocean processes are dynamic, complex, and occur on multiple spatial and temporal scales. To obtain a synoptic view of such processes, ocean scientists collect data over long time pe- riods. Historically, measurements were continually provided by fixed sensors, e.g., moorings, or gathered from ships. Recently, an increase in the utilization of autonomous underwater vehicles has enabled a more dynamic data acquisition approach. However, we still do not utilize the full capabilities of these vehicles. Here we present algorithms that produce per- sistent monitoring missions for underwater vehicles by balancing path following accuracy and sampling resolution for a given region of interest, which addresses a pressing need among ocean scientists to efficiently and effectively collect high-value data. More specifically, this paper proposes a path planning algorithm and a speed control algo- rithm for underwater gliders, which together give informative trajectories for the glider to persistently monitor a patch of ocean. We optimize a cost function that blends two com- peting factors: maximize the information value along the path, while minimizing deviation from the planned path due to ocean currents. Speed is controlled along the planned path by adjusting the pitch angle of the underwater glider, so that higher resolution samples are collected in areas of higher information value. The resulting paths are closed circuits that can be repeatedly traversed to collect long-term ocean data in dynamic environments. The algorithms were tested during sea trials on an underwater glider operating off the coast of southern California, as well as in Monterey Bay, California. The experimental results show significant improvements in data resolution and path reliability compared to previously ex- ecuted sampling paths used in the respective regions.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2011a,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Mac Schwager and Stephen L. Smith and Burton H. Jones and Daniela Rus and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Adapting Sampling Resolution},
      journal = {Journal of Field Robotics},
      year = {2011},
      volume = {28},
      number = {5},
      pages = {714 -- 741},
      url = {http://cres.usc.edu/cgi-bin/print_pub_details.pl?pubid=710}
    }
    					
    Smith2011b Smith, R.N.; Singh, S.B.; Luca; Cazzaro, D.; Choi, S.K.; Mariani, G. & Chyba, M. A Geometric Approach to Trajectory Design for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle: Surveying the Bulbous Bow of a Ship 2011 Acta Applicandae Mathematicae
    Vol. 115 (2) , pp. 209-232  
    article geometric control, ship-hull inspection, autonomous underwater vehicle, path planning
    Abstract: In this paper, we present a control strategy design technique for an au- tonomous underwater vehicle based on solutions to the motion planning problem derived from differential geometric methods. The motion planning problem is motivated by the practical application of surveying the hull of a ship for implications of harbor and port security. In recent years, engineers and researchers have been collaborating on automating ship hull inspections by employing autonomous vehicles. Despite the progresses made, human intervention is still necessary at this stage. To increase the functionality of these autonomous systems, we focus on developing model-based control strategies for the survey missions around challenging regions, such as the bulbous bow region of a ship. Recent advances in differential geometry have given rise to the field of geometric control theory. This has proven to be an effective framework for control strategy design for mechanical systems, and has recently been extended to applications for underwater vehicles. Advantages of geometric control theory include the exploitation of symmetries and nonlinearities inherent to the system. Here, we examine the posed inspection problem from a path planning view- point, applying recently developed techniques from the field of differential geometric control theory to design the control strategies that steer the vehicle along the prescribed path. Three potential scenarios for surveying a ship?s bulbous bow region are motivated for path planning applications. For each scenario, we compute the control strategy and implement it onto a test-bed vehicle. Experimental results are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2011b,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Shashi B. Singh and Luca and Dario Cazzaro and Song K. Choi and Giacomo Mariani and Monique Chyba},
      title = {A Geometric Approach to Trajectory Design for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle: Surveying the Bulbous Bow of a Ship},
      journal = {Acta Applicandae Mathematicae},
      year = {2011},
      volume = {115},
      number = {2},
      pages = {209--232}
    }
    					
    Smith2011c Smith, R.N. & Dunbabin, M. Controlled Drift: An Investigation into the Controllability of Underwater Vehicles with Minimal Actuation 2011 Proceedings of the Australasian Conference on Robotics and Automation   inproceedings autonomous robotics, ocean modeling, oceanography, physical oceanography, ocean engineering, autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory, differential geometry
    Abstract: This paper is directed towards providing an answer to the question, ?Can you control the trajectory of a Lagrangian float?? Being a float that has minimal actuation (only buoyancy control), their horizontal trajectory is dictated through drifting with ocean currents. However, with the appropriate vertical actuation and utilising spatio-temporal variations in water speed and direction, we show here that broad controllabilty results can be met such as waypoint following to keep a float inside of a bay or out of a designated region. This paper extends theory experimentally evaluted on horizontally actuated Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for trajectory control utilising ocean forecast models and presents an initial investigation into the controllability of these minimally actuated drifting AUVs. Simulated results for offshore coastal and within highly dynamic tidal bays illustrate two tech- niques with the promise for an affirmative answer to the posed question above.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2011c,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Matthew Dunbabin},
      title = {Controlled Drift: An Investigation into the Controllability of Underwater Vehicles with Minimal Actuation},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the Australasian Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2011}
    }
    					
    Smith2011e Smith, R.N.; Das, J.; Hine, G.; Anderson, W. & Sukhatme, G.S. Predicting Wave Glider Speed from Environmental Measurements 2011 Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans '11 - Kona   inproceedings wave glider, speed prediction, gaussian process regression, autonomous vehicle, dynamics, kinematics
    Abstract: In the ocean science community, researchers have begun employing novel sensor platforms as integral pieces in oceanographic data collection, which have significantly advanced the study and prediction of complex and dynamic ocean phenomena. These innovative tools are able to provide scientists with data at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolutions. This paper focuses on the newly developed Wave Glider platform from Liquid Robotics. This vehicle produces forward motion by harvesting abundant natural energy from ocean waves, and provides a persistent ocean presence for detailed ocean observation. This study is targeted at determining a kinematic model for offline planning that provides an accurate estimation of the vehicle speed for a desired heading and set of environmental parameters. Given the significant wave height, ocean surface and subsurface currents, wind speed and direction, we present the formulation of a system identification to provide the vehicle's speed over a range of possible directions.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2011e,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jnaneshwar Das and Graham Hine and Will Anderson and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Predicting Wave Glider Speed from Environmental Measurements},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the MTS/IEEE Oceans '11 - Kona},
      year = {2011}
    }
    					
    Smith2011f Smith, R.N.; Prentis, P.; Langendoen, K. & Corke, P. Pseudoseeds: Investigating Long-Distance, Ocean Seed Dispersal with Wireless Sensors 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Workshop on Robotics for Environmental Monitoring   conference wireless sensor network, seed dispersal, ocean currents, environmental monitoring, long distance tracking
    Abstract: Recent theoretical research has shown that ocean currents and wind interact to disperse seeds over long distances among isolated landmasses. Dispersal of seeds among isolated oceanic islands, by birds, oceans and man, is a well-known phenomenon, and many widespread island plants have traits that facilitate this process. Crucially, however, there have been no mechanistic vector-based models of long-distance dispersal for seeds among isolated oceanic islands based on empirical data. Here, we propose a plan to develop seed analogues, or pseudoseeds, fitted with wireless sensor technology that will enable high-fidelity tracking as they disperse across the ocean. The pseudoseeds will be precisely designed to mimic actual seed buoyancy and morphology enabling realistic and accurate, vector-based dispersal models of ocean seed dispersal over vast geographic scales.
    BibTeX:
    @conference{Smith2011f,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Peter Prentis and Koen Langendoen and Peter Corke},
      title = {Pseudoseeds: Investigating Long-Distance, Ocean Seed Dispersal with Wireless Sensors},
      booktitle = {IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Workshop on Robotics for Environmental Monitoring},
      year = {2011},
      url = {http://www.iros2011.org/WorkshopsAndTutorialsProceedings/FW7/WREM2011Proceedings.pdf}
    }
    					
    Chyba2009a Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T. & Smith, R.N. Chapter 8 ( Optimization problems for controlled mechanical systems: Bridging the gap between theory and application ) 2010 Optimization problems for controlled mechanical systems: Bridging the gap between theory and application (ISBN 978-953-307-048-3) Modelling Simulation and Optimization , pp. 167 - 186   incollection optimal control, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: Mechanical control systems have become a part of our everyday life. Systems such as automobiles, robot manipulators, mobile robots, satellites, buildings with active vibration controllers and air conditioning systems, make life easier and safer, as well as help us explore the world we live in and exploit it?s available resources. In this chapter, we examine a specific example of a mechanical control system; the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). Our contribution to the advancement of AUV research is in the area of guidance and control. We present innovative techniques to design and implement control strategies that consider the optimization of time and/or energy consumption. Recent advances in robotics, control theory, portable energy sources and automation increase our ability to create more intelligent robots, and allows us to conduct more explo- rations by use of autonomous vehicles. This facilitates access to higher risk areas, longer time underwater, and more efficient exploration as compared to human occupied vehicles. The use of underwater vehicles is expanding in every area of ocean science. Such vehicles are used by oceanographers, archaeologists, geologists, ocean engineers, and many others. These vehicles are designed to be agile, versatile and robust, and thus, their usage has gone from novelty to necessity for any ocean expedition.
    BibTeX:
    @incollection{Chyba2009a,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Optimization problems for controlled mechanical systems: Bridging the gap between theory and application},
      booktitle = {Modelling Simulation and Optimization},
      publisher = {INTECH},
      year = {2010},
      number = {ISBN 978-953-307-048-3},
      pages = {167 -- 186},
      url = {http://sciyo.com/books/show/title/modelling-simulation-and-optimization}
    }
    					
    Smith2010 Smith, R.N.; Chao, Y.; Li, P.P.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Planning and Implementing Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to Track Evolving Ocean Processes based on Predictions from a Regional Ocean Model 2010 International Journal of Robotics Research
    Vol. 29 (12) , pp. 1475-1497  
    article ocean modeling, oceanography, physical oceanography, biological oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering, control theory, harmful algal blooms
    Abstract: Path planning and trajectory design for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) is of great importance to the oceanographic research community because automated data collection is becoming more prevalent. Intelligent planning is required to maneuver a vehicle to high-valued locations to perform data collection. In this paper, we present algorithms that determine paths for AUVs to track evolving features of interest in the ocean by considering the output of predictive ocean models. While traversing the computed path, the vehicle provides near-real-time, in situ measurements back to the model, with the intent to increase the skill of future predictions in the local region. The results presented here extend prelim- inary developments of the path planning portion of an end-to-end autonomous prediction and tasking system for aquatic, mobile sensor networks. This extension is the incorporation of multiple vehicles to track the centroid and the boundary of the extent of a feature of interest. Similar algorithms to those presented here are under development to consider additional locations for multiple types of features. The primary focus here is on algorithm development utilizing model predictions to assist in solving the motion planning problem of steering an AUV to high-valued locations, with respect to the data desired. We discuss the design technique to generate the paths, present simulation results and provide experimental data from field deployments for tracking dynamic features by use of an AUV in the Southern California coastal ocean.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2010,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Yi Chao and Peggy P. Li and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Planning and Implementing Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to Track Evolving Ocean Processes based on Predictions from a Regional Ocean Model},
      journal = {International Journal of Robotics Research},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {29},
      number = {12},
      pages = {1475-1497},
      url = {http://cres.usc.edu/cgi-bin/print_pub_details.pl?pubid=646},
      doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0278364910377243}
    }
    					
    Smith2010a Smith, R.N.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Pereira, A.; Cetinić, I.; Darjany, L.; Garneau, M.- Howard, M.D.; Oberg, C.; Ragan, M.; Schnetzer, A.; Seubert, E.; Smith, E.C.; Stauffer, B.A.; Toro-Farmer, G.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. USC CINAPS Builds Bridges: Observing and Monitoring the Southern California Bight 2010 IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, Special Issue on Marine Robotics Systems
    Vol. 17 (1) , pp. 20-30  
    article oceanography, physical oceanography, biological oceanography, harmful algal blooms, autonomous robotics, wireless sensor network, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: More than 70% of our earth is covered by water, yet we have explored less than 5% of the aquatic environment. Aquatic robots, such as autono- mous underwater vehicles (AUVs), and their supporting infrastructure play a major role in the collection of oceanographic data. To make new discoveries and improve our overall understanding of the ocean, scientists must make use of these platforms by implementing effective monitoring and sampling techniques to study ocean upwelling, tidal mixing, and other ocean processes. Effective observation and continual monitoring of a dynamic system as complex as the ocean cannot be done with one instrument in a fixed location. A more practical approach is to deploy a collection of static and mobile sensors, where the information gleaned from the acquired data is distributed across the network. Additionally, orchestrating a multisensor, long-term deployment with a high volume of distributed data involves a robust, rapid, and cost-effective communication network. Connecting all of these components, which form an aquatic robotic system, in synchro- nous operation can greatly assist the scientists in improving our overall understanding of the complex ocean environment.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2010a,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Arvind Pereira and Ivona Cetinić and Lindsay Darjany and Marie-Ève Garneau and Meredith D. Howard and Carl Oberg and Matthew Ragan and Astrid Schnetzer and Erica Seubert and Ellen C. Smith and Beth A. Stauffer and Gerardo Toro-Farmer and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {USC CINAPS Builds Bridges: Observing and Monitoring the Southern California Bight},
      journal = {IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, Special Issue on Marine Robotics Systems},
      year = {2010},
      volume = {17},
      number = {1},
      pages = {20--30}
    }
    					
    Smith2010b Smith, R.N.; Kelly, J.; Chao, Y.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Towards Improvement of Autonomous Glider Navigation Accuracy through the use of Regional Ocean Models 2010 Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering , pp. 597-606   inproceedings ocean modeling, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, kalman filter, robotics navigation, ocean engineering
    Abstract: Autonomous underwater gliders are robust and widely- used ocean sampling platforms that are characterized by their endurance, and are one of the best approaches to gather subsurface data at the appropriate spatial resolution to advance our knowledge of the ocean environment. Gliders generally do not employ sophisticated sensors for underwater localization, but instead dead-reckon between set waypoints. Thus, these vehicles are subject to large positional errors between prescribed and actual surfacing locations. Here, we investigate the implementation of a large-scale, regional ocean model into the trajectory de- sign for autonomous gliders to improve their navigational accuracy. We compute the dead-reckoning error for our Slocum gliders, and compare this to the average positional error recorded from multiple deployments conducted over the past year. We then compare trajectory plans computed on-board the vehicle during recent deployments to our prediction-based trajectory plans for 140 surfacing occurrences.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2010b,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jonathan Kelly and Yi Chao and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Towards Improvement of Autonomous Glider Navigation Accuracy through the use of Regional Ocean Models},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {597-606}
    }
    					
    Smith2010c Smith, R.N.; Das, J.; Chao, Y.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Cooperative Multi-AUV Tracking of Phytoplankton Blooms based on Ocean Model Predictions 2010 Proceedings of Oceans '10 - IEEE Sydney , pp. 1 - 10   inproceedings ocean modeling, oceanography, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, harmful algal blooms, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: In recent years, ocean scientists have started to employ many new forms of technology as integral pieces in oceanographic data collection for the study and prediction of complex and dynamic ocean phenomena. One area of technological advancement in ocean sampling if the use of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) as mobile sensor plat- forms. Currently, most AUV deployments execute a lawnmower- type pattern or repeated transects for surveys and sampling missions. An advantage of these missions is that the regularity of the trajectory design generally makes it easier to extract the exact path of the vehicle via post-processing. However, if the deployment region for the pattern is poorly selected, the AUV can entirely miss collecting data during an event of specific interest. Here, we consider an innovative technology toolchain to assist in determining the deployment location and executed paths for AUVs to maximize scientific information gain about dynamically evolving ocean phenomena. In particular, we provide an assessment of computed paths based on ocean model predictions designed to put AUVs in the right place at the right time to gather data related to the understanding of algal and phytoplankton blooms.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2010c,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jnaneshwar Das and Yi Chao and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Cooperative Multi-AUV Tracking of Phytoplankton Blooms based on Ocean Model Predictions},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of Oceans '10 - IEEE Sydney},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {1 - 10},
      url = {http://cres.usc.edu/cgi-bin/print_pub_details.pl?pubid=655}
    }
    					
    Smith2010d Smith, R.N.; Pereira, A.; Chao, Y.; Li, P.P.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Trajectory Design Coupled with Predictive Ocean Models: A Case Study 2010 Proceedings of The IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation , pp. 4770-4777   inproceedings ocean modeling, oceanography, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory, ocean engineering
    Abstract: Data collection using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) is increasing in importance within the oceano- graphic research community. Contrary to traditional moored or static platforms, mobile sensors require intelligent planning strategies to maneuver through the ocean. However, the ability to navigate to high-value locations and collect data with specific scientific merit is worth the planning efforts. In this study, we examine the use of ocean model predictions to determine the locations to be visited by an AUV, and aid in planning the trajectory that the vehicle executes during the sampling mission. The objectives are: a) to provide near-real time, in situ measurements to a large-scale ocean model to increase the skill of future predictions, and b) to utilize ocean model predictions as a component in an end-to-end autonomous prediction and tasking system for aquatic, mobile sensor networks. We present an algorithm designed to generate paths for AUVs to track a dynamically evolving ocean feature utilizing ocean model predictions. This builds on previous work in this area by incorporating the predicted current velocities into the path planning to assist in solving the 3-D motion planning problem of steering an AUV between two selected locations. We present simulation results for tracking a fresh water plume by use of our algorithm. Additionally, we present experimental results from field trials that test the skill of the model used as well as the incorporation of the model predictions into an AUV trajectory planner. These results indicate a modest, but measurable, improvement in surfacing error when the model predictions are incorporated into the planner.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2010d,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Arvind Pereira and Yi Chao and Peggy P. Li and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Trajectory Design Coupled with Predictive Ocean Models: A Case Study},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of The IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation},
      year = {2010},
      pages = {4770-4777}
    }
    					
    Caron2009 Caron, D.; Stauffer, B.; Darjany, L.; Oberg, C.; Pereira, A.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Smith, R.N.; Smith, E.C.; Seubert, E.; Garneau, M.-E.; Howard, M.; Jones, B.; Cetinic, I. & Sukhatme, G. Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: An Overview 2009 (421) Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing   inproceedings oceanography, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, wireless sensor network, ocean engineering
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Caron2009,
      author = {David Caron and Beth Stauffer and Lindsay Darjany and Carl Oberg and Arvind Pereira and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Ryan N. Smith and Ellen C. Smith and Erica Seubert and Marie-Eve Garneau and Meredith Howard and Burt Jones and Ivona Cetinic and Gaurav Sukhatme},
      title = {Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: An Overview},
      booktitle = {Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing},
      year = {2009},
      number = {421},
      url = {http://repositories.cdlib.org/cens/Posters/421}
    }
    					
    Chyba2009 Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R. & Wilkens, G. A Geometrical Analysis of Trajectory Design for Underwater Vehicles 2009 Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems-B
    Vol. 11 (2) , pp. 233-262  
    article differential geometry, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle
    Abstract: Designing trajectories for a submerged rigid body motivates this paper. Two approaches are addressed: the time optimal approach and the motion planning ap- proach using concatenation of kinematic motions. We focus on the structure of singular extremals and their relation to the existence of rank-one kinematic reduc- tions; thereby linking the optimization problem to the inherent geometric frame- work. Using these kinematic reductions, we provide a solution to the motion plan- ning problem in the under-actuated scenario, or equivalently, in the case of actuator failures. We finish the paper comparing a time optimal trajectory to one formed by concatenation of pure motions.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Chyba2009,
      author = {M. Chyba and T. Haberkorn and R.N. Smith and G.R. Wilkens},
      title = {A Geometrical Analysis of Trajectory Design for Underwater Vehicles},
      journal = {Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems-B},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {11},
      number = {2},
      pages = {233--262}
    }
    					
    Chyba2009c Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N.; Singh, S. & Choi, S. Increasing Underwater Vehicle Autonomy by Reducing Energy Consumption 2009 Ocean Engineering: Special Edition on AUVs
    Vol. 36(1) , pp. 62-73  
    article optimal control, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: In this paper, we concern ourselves with finding a control strategy that minimizes energy consumption along a trajectory connecting two given configurations. We develop an algorithm, based on our previous work with the time optimal problem, which provides implementable control strategies that are energy efficient. We find an interesting correlation between the duration of these trajectories and the optimal duration. We present the algorithm, control strategy and experimental results from our test-bed vehicle.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Chyba2009c,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and S.B. Singh and S.K. Choi},
      title = {Increasing Underwater Vehicle Autonomy by Reducing Energy Consumption},
      journal = {Ocean Engineering: Special Edition on AUVs},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {36(1)},
      pages = {62-73}
    }
    					
    Pereira2009 Pereira, A.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Smith, R.N.; Stauffer, B.; Seubert, E.; Garneau, M.-E.; Howard, M.; Darjany, L.; Oberg, C.; Cetinic, I.; Ragan, M.; Smith, E.C.; Toro-Farmer, G.; Arrichiello, F.; Caron, D.; Schnetzer, A.; Jones, B. & Sukhatme, G. Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments for use in Coastal Environmental Assessment in Southern California 2009 (419) Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing   inproceedings oceanography, harmful algal blooms, biological oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Pereira2009,
      author = {Arvind Pereira and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Ryan N. Smith and Beth Stauffer and Erica Seubert and Marie-Eve Garneau and Meredith Howard and Lindsay Darjany and Carl Oberg and Ivona Cetinic and Matthew Ragan and Ellen C. Smith and Gerardo Toro-Farmer and Filippo Arrichiello and David Caron and Astrid Schnetzer and Burton Jones and Gaurav Sukhatme},
      title = {Networked Robotic Sensor Platform Deployments for use in Coastal Environmental Assessment in Southern California},
      booktitle = {Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing},
      year = {2009},
      number = {419},
      url = {http://repositories.cdlib.org/cens/Posters/419}
    }
    					
    Singh2009 Singh, S.B.; Sanyal, A.; Smith, R.N.; Nordkvist, N. & Chyba, M. Robust Tracking Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in the Presence of Disturbance Inputs 2009 Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering , pp. 345-351   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory, ocean engineering
    Abstract: An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is expected to operate in an ocean in the presence of poorly known disturbance forces and moments. The uncertainties of the environment makes it difficult to apply open-loop control scheme for the motion planning of the vehicle. The objective of this paper is to develop a robust feedback trajectory tracking control scheme for an AUV that can track a prescribed trajectory amidst such disturbances. We solve a general problem of feedback trajectory tracking of an AUV in SE(3). The feedback control scheme is derived using Lyapunov-type analysis. The results obtained from numerical simulations confirm the asymptotic tracking properties of the feedback control law. We apply the feedback control scheme to different mission scenarios, with the disturbances being initial errors in the state of the AUV.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Singh2009,
      author = {Shashi B. Singh and Amit Sanyal and Ryan N. Smith and Nikolaj Nordkvist and Monique Chyba},
      title = {Robust Tracking Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in the Presence of Disturbance Inputs},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {345-351}
    }
    					
    Smith2009 Smith, R.N.; Chyba, M.; Wilkens, G.R. & Catone, C.J. A geometrical approach to the motion planning problem for a submerged rigid body 2009 International Journal of Control
    Vol. 82 (9) , pp. 1641-1656  
    article differential geometry, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: The main focus of this paper is the motion planning problem for a deeply submerged rigid body. The equations of motion are formulated and presented by use of the framework of differential geometry and these equations incorporate external dissipative and restoring forces. We consider a kinematic reduction of the affine connection control system for the rigid body submerged in an ideal fluid, and present an extension of this reduction to the forced affine connection control system for the rigid body submerged in a viscous fluid. The motion planning strategy is based on kinematic motions; the integral curves of rank one kinematic reductions. This method is of particular interest to autonomous underwater vehicles which can not directly control all six degrees of freedom (such as torpedo shaped AUVs) or in case of actuator failure (i.e., under-actuated scenario). A practical example is included to illustrate our technique.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Smith2009,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Monique Chyba and George R. Wilkens and Christopher J. Catone},
      title = {A geometrical approach to the motion planning problem for a submerged rigid body},
      journal = {International Journal of Control},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {82},
      number = {9},
      pages = {1641--1656}
    }
    					
    Smith2009a Smith, R.N.; Chao, Y.; Jones, B.H.; Caron, D.A.; Li, P.P. & Sukhatme, G.S. Howard, A.; Iagnemma, K. & Kelly, A. (Hrsg.) Trajectory Design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Ocean Model Predictions for Feature Tracking 2009
    Vol. 62 Proceedings of The $7^th$ International Conference on Field and Service Robotics , pp. 263-273  
    inproceedings ocean modeling, oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering, harmful algal blooms
    Abstract: Trajectory design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) is of great importance to the oceanographic research community. Intelligent planning is required to maneuver a vehicle to high-valued locations for data collection. We con- sider the use of ocean model predictions to determine the locations to be visited by an AUV, which then provides near-real time, in situ measurements back to the model to increase the skill of future predictions. The motion planning problem of steering the vehicle between the computed waypoints is not considered here. Our focus is on the algorithm to determine relevant points of interest for a chosen oceanographic feature. This represents a first approach to an end to end autonomous prediction and tasking system for aquatic, mobile sensor networks. We design a sampling plan and present experimental results with AUV retasking in the Southern California Bight (SCB) off the coast of Los Angeles.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009a,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Yi Chao and Burton H. Jones and David A. Caron and Peggy P. Li and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Trajectory Design for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Ocean Model Predictions for Feature Tracking},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of The $7^th$ International Conference on Field and Service Robotics},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      year = {2009},
      volume = {62},
      pages = {263-273}
    }
    					
    Smith2009b Smith, R.N.; Stauffer, B.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Pereira, A.A.; Chao, Y.; Darjany, L.; Cetinic, I.; Estrin, D.; Oberg, C.; Ragan, M.; Jones, B.H.; Sukhatme, G.S. & Caron, D.A. Design and Implementation of Sensor Networks for the Observation and Research of Harmful Algal Blooms in Southern California Coastal Waters 2009 Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Environmental Sensing Networks   inproceedings harmful algal blooms, oceanography, physical oceanography, autonomous underwater vehicle, wireless sensor network
    Abstract: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) have become an important environmental concern along the western coast of the United States. Toxic and noxious blooms adversely impact the economies of coastal communities in the region, pose risks to human health, and cause mortality events that have resulted in the deaths of thousands of fish, marine mammals and seabirds. One goal of field-based research efforts on this topic is the development of predictive models of HABs that would enable rapid response, mitigation and ultimately prevention of these events. In turn, these objectives are predicated on understanding the environmental conditions that stimulate these transient phenomena. An embedded sensor network (Fig. 1), under development in the San Pedro Shelf region off the Southern California coast, is providing tools for acquiring chemical, physical and biological data at high temporal and spatial resolution to help document the emergence and persistence of HAB events, supporting the design and testing of predictive models, and providing contextual information for experimental studies designed to reveal the environmental conditions promoting HABs. The sensor platforms contained within this network include pier-based sensor arrays, ocean moorings, HF radar stations, along with mobile sensor nodes in the form of surface and subsurface autonomous vehicles. FreewaveTM radio modems facilitate network communication and form a minimally-intrusive, wireless communication infrastructure throughout the Southern California coastal region, allowing rapid and cost-effective data transfer. An emerging focus of this project is the incorporation of a predictive ocean model that assimilates near-real time, in situ data from deployed Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). The model then assimilates the data to increase the skill of both nowcasts and forecasts, thus providing insight into bloom initiation as well as the movement of blooms or other oceanic features of interest (e.g., thermoclines, fronts, river discharge, etc.). From these predictions, deployed mobile sensors can be tasked to track a designated feature. This focus has led to the creation of a technology chain in which algorithms are being implemented for the innovative trajectory design for AUVs. Such intelligent mission planning is required to maneuver a vehicle to precise depths and locations that are the sites of active blooms, or physical/chemical features that might be sources of bloom initiation or persistence. The embedded network yields high-resolution, temporal and spatial measurements of pertinent environmental parameters and resulting biology (see Fig. 1). Supplementing this with ocean current information and remotely sensed imagery and meteorological data, we obtain a comprehensive foundation for developing a fundamental understanding of HAB events. This then directs labor- intensive and costly sampling efforts and analyses. Additionally, we provide coastal municipalities, managers and state agencies with detailed information to aid their efforts in providing responsible environmental stewardship of their coastal waters.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009b,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Beth Stauffer and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Arvind A. Pereira and Yi Chao and Lindsay Darjany and Ivona Cetinic and Deborah Estrin and Carl Oberg and Matthew Ragan and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme and David A. Caron},
      title = {Design and Implementation of Sensor Networks for the Observation and Research of Harmful Algal Blooms in Southern California Coastal Waters},
      booktitle = { Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Environmental Sensing Networks},
      year = {2009},
      url = {http://cres.usc.edu/cgi-bin/print_pub_details.pl?pubid=636}
    }
    					
    Smith2009c Smith, R.N.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Pereira, A.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Implementation of an Embedded Sensor Network for the Coordination of Slocum Gliders for Coastal Monitoring and Observation 2009 WUWNet '09: Proceedings of the Fourth ACM International Workshop on UnderWater Networks , pp. 1-8   inproceedings oceanography, wireless sensor network, autonomous underwater vehicle, environmental monitoring, harmful algal blooms
    Abstract: Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are revolutioniz- ing oceanography through their versatility, autonomy and endurance. However, they are still an underutilized tech- nology. For coastal operations, the ability to track a cer- tain feature is of interest to ocean scientists. Adaptive and predictive path planning requires frequent communication with significant data transfer. Currently, most AUVs rely on satellite phones as their primary communication. This communication protocol is expensive and slow. To reduce communication costs and provide adequate data transfer rates, we present a hardware modification along with a soft- ware system that provides an alternative robust disruption- tolerant communications framework enabling cost-effective glider operation in coastal regions. The framework is specif- ically designed to address multi-sensor deployments. We provide a system overview and present testing and cover- age data for the network. Additionally, we include an ap- plication of ocean-model driven trajectory design, which can benefit from the use of this network and communication sys- tem. Simulation and implementation results are presented for single and multiple vehicle deployments. The presented combination of infrastructure, software development and de- ployment experience brings us closer to the goal of providing a reliable and cost-effective data transfer framework to en- able real-time, optimal trajectory design, based on ocean model predictions, to gather in situ measurements of inter- esting and evolving ocean features and phenomena.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009c,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Arvind Pereira and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Implementation of an Embedded Sensor Network for the Coordination of Slocum Gliders for Coastal Monitoring and Observation},
      booktitle = {WUWNet '09: Proceedings of the Fourth ACM International Workshop on UnderWater Networks},
      publisher = {ACM},
      year = {2009},
      pages = {1--8},
      doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1654130.1654132}
    }
    					
    Smith2009d Smith, R.N.; Chyba, M.; Choi, S.K. & Marani, G. Guidance and Control for Underactuated Autonomous Underwater Vehicles 2009 Proceedings of the 8$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2009   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering, differential geometry, control theory
    Abstract: The main focus of this paper is on the motion planning problem for an under-actuated, submerged, Omni-directional autonomous vehicle. Underactuation is extremely important to consider in ocean research and exploration. Battery failure, actuator malfunction and electronic shorts are a few reasons that may cause the vehicle to lose direct control of one or more degrees-of-freedom. Underactuation is also critical to understand when designing vehicles for specific tasks, such as torpedo-shaped vehicles. An under-actuated vehicle is less controllable, and hence, the motion planning problem is more difficult. Here, we present techniques based on geometric control to provide solutions to the under-actuated motion planning problem for a submerged underwater vehicle. Our results are validated with experiments.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009d,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Monique Chyba and Song K. Choi and Giacomo Marani},
      title = {Guidance and Control for Underactuated Autonomous Underwater Vehicles},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2009},
      year = {2009}
    }
    					
    Smith2009h Smith, R.N.; Periera, A.; Chao, Y.; Oberg, C.; Ragan, M.; Caron, D.A.; Jones, B.H. & Sukhatme, G.S. Design and Implementation of Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Predictions from a Regional Ocean Model 2009 Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing   inproceedings ocean engineering, physical oceanography, control theory, path planning, ocean modeling, autonomous underwater vehicle, environmental monitoring, harmful algal blooms
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009h,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith and Arvind Periera and Yi Chao and Carl Oberg and Matthew Ragan and David A. Caron and Burton H. Jones and Gaurav S. Sukhatme},
      title = {Design and Implementation of Trajectories for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles based on Predictions from a Regional Ocean Model },
      booktitle = {Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing},
      year = {2009}
    }
    					
    Smith2009i Smith, R.; Das, J.; Heidarsson, H.; Pereira, A.; Chao, Y.; Cetinic, I.; Oberg, C.; Ragan, M.; Jones, B.; Caron, D. & Sukhatme, G. Trajectory Design and Implementation for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on Ocean Model Predictions 2009 (427) Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing   inproceedings ocean engineering, ocean modeling, autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2009i,
      author = {Ryan Smith and Jnaneshwar Das and Hordur Heidarsson and Arvind Pereira and Yi Chao and Ivona Cetinic and Carl Oberg and Matthew Ragan and Burton Jones and David Caron and Gaurav Sukhatme},
      title = {Trajectory Design and Implementation for Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Based on Ocean Model Predictions},
      booktitle = {Posters for the Center for Embedded Network Sensing},
      year = {2009},
      number = {427},
      url = {http://repositories.cdlib.org/cens/Posters/427}
    }
    					
    Chyba2008 Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N. & Choi, S. Autonomous Underwater Vehicles: Development and Implementation of Time and Energy Efficient Trajectories 2008 Ship Technology Research
    Vol. 55 (2) , pp. 36-48  
    article optimal control, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are increasingly used, both in military and civilian applications. These vehicles are limited mainly by the intelligence we give them and the life of their batteries. Research is active to extend vehicle autonomy in both aspects. Our intent is to give the vehicle the ability to adapt its behavior under different mission scenarios (emergency maneuvers versus long duration monitoring). This involves a search for optimal trajectories minimizing time, energy or a combination of both. Despite some success stories in AUV control, optimal control is still a very underdeveloped area. Adaptive control research has contributed to cost minimization problems, but vehicle design has been the driving force for advancement in optimal control research. We look to advance the development of optimal control theory by expanding the motions along which AUVs travel. Traditionally, AUVs have taken the role of performing the long data gathering mission in the open ocean with little to no interaction with their surroundings, MacIver et al. (2004). The AUV is used to find the shipwreck, and the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) handles the exploration up close. AUV mission profiles of this sort are best suited through the use of a torpedo shaped AUV, Bertram and Alvarez (2006), since straight lines and minimal (0 deg - 30 deg) angular displacements are all that are necessary to perform the transects and grid lines for these applications. However, the torpedo shape AUV lacks the ability to perform low-speed maneuvers in cluttered environments, such as autonomous exploration close to the seabed and around obstacles, MacIver et al. (2004). Thus, we consider an agile vehicle capable of movement in six degrees of freedom without any preference of direction.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Chyba2008,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and S.K. Choi},
      title = {Autonomous Underwater Vehicles: Development and Implementation of Time and Energy Efficient Trajectories},
      journal = {Ship Technology Research},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {55},
      number = {2},
      pages = {36--48}
    }
    					
    Chyba2008a Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N.; Choi, S.K.; Mariani, G. & M$^c$Leod, C. Efficient Control of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle while accounting for Thruster Failure 2008 Proceedings of the 7$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2008   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, optimal control, control theory, ocean engineering
    Abstract: This paper is concerned with the design and implementation of control strategies onto a test-bed vehicle with six degrees-of-freedom. We design our trajectories to be efficient in time and in power consumption. Moreover, we also consider cases when actuator failure can arise and discuss alternate control strategies in this situation. Our calculations are supplemented by experimental results.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2008a,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and Song K. Choi and G. Mariani and C. M$^c$Leod},
      title = {Efficient Control of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle while accounting for Thruster Failure},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 7$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2008},
      year = {2008}
    }
    					
    Chyba2008b Chyba, M. & Smith, R.N. A First Extension of Geometric Control Theory to Underwater Vehicles 2008
    Vol. 2 (1) Proceedings of the 2008 IFAC Workshop on Navigation, Guidance and Control of Underwater Vehicles  
    inproceedings differential geometry, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: This paper serves as a first study on the implementation of control strategies developed using a kinematic reduction onto test bed autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The equations of motion are presented in the framework of differential geometry, including external dissipative forces, as a forced affine connection control system. We show that the hydrodynamic drag forces can be included in the affine connection, resulting in an affine connection control system. The definitions of kinematic reduction and decoupling vector field are thus extended from the ideal fluid scenario. Control strategies are computed using this new extension and are reformulated for implementation onto a test-bed AUV. We compare these geometrically computed controls to time and energy optimal controls for the same trajectory which are computed using a previously developed algorithm. Through this comparison we are able to validate our theoretical results based on the experiments conducted using the time and energy efficient strategies.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2008b,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {A First Extension of Geometric Control Theory to Underwater Vehicles},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2008 IFAC Workshop on Navigation, Guidance and Control of Underwater Vehicles},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {2},
      number = {1}
    }
    					
    Chyba2008c Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N. & Choi, S. Design and Implementation of Time Efficient Trajectories for an Underwater Vehicle 2008 Ocean Engineering
    Vol. 35 (1) , pp. 63-76  
    article optimal control, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: This paper discusses control strategies adapted for practical implementation and efficient motion of underwater vehicles. These trajectories are piecewise constant thrust arcs with few actuator switchings. We provide the numerical algorithm which computes the time efficient trajectories parameterized by the switching times. We discuss both the theoretical analysis and experimental implementation results.
    BibTeX:
    @article{Chyba2008c,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and S.K. Choi},
      title = {Design and Implementation of Time Efficient Trajectories for an Underwater Vehicle},
      journal = {Ocean Engineering},
      year = {2008},
      volume = {35},
      number = {1},
      pages = {63-76}
    }
    					
    Smith2008 Smith, R.N.; Chyba, M. & Singh, S.B. Decoupled Trajectory Planning for a Submerged Rigid Body Subject to Dissipative and Potential Forces 2008 Proceedings of the IEEE Region 10 Colloquium and Third International Conference on Industrial and Information Systems   inproceedings differential geometry, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: This paper studies the practical but challenging problem of motion planning for a deeply submerged rigid body. Here, we formulate the dynamic equations of motion of a submerged rigid body under the architecture of differential geometric mechanics and include external dissipative and potential forces. The mechanical system is represented as a forced affine-connection control system on the configuration space SE(3). Solutions to the motion planning problem are computed by concatenating and reparameterizing the integral curves of decoupling vector fields. We provide an extension to this inverse kinematic method to compensate for external potential forces caused by buoyancy and gravity. We present a mission scenario and implement the theoretically computed control strategy onto a test-bed autonomous underwater vehicle. This scenario emphasizes the use of this motion planning technique in the under-actuated situation; the vehicle loses direct control on one or more degrees of freedom. We include experimental results to illustrate our technique and validate our method.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Smith2008,
      author = {R. N. Smith and M. Chyba and S. B. Singh},
      title = {Decoupled Trajectory Planning for a Submerged Rigid Body Subject to Dissipative and Potential Forces},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE Region 10 Colloquium and Third International Conference on Industrial and Information Systems},
      year = {2008}
    }
    					
    Smith2008a Smith, R.N. Geometric Control Theory and its Application to Underwater Vehicles 2008 School: University of Hawai`i at Manoa   phdthesis differential geometry, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: This dissertation is based on theoretical study and experiments which extend geometric control theory to practical applications within the field of ocean engineering. We present a method for path planning and control design for underwater vehicles by use of the archi- tecture of differential geometry. In addition to the theoretical design of the trajectory and control strategy, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the method via the implementation onto a test-bed autonomous underwater vehicle. Bridging the gap between theory and application is the ultimate goal of control the- ory. Major developments have occurred recently in the field of geometric control which narrow this gap and which promote research linking theory and application. In particular, Riemannian and affine differential geometry have proven to be a very effective approach to the modeling of mechanical systems such as underwater vehicles. In this framework, the application of a kinematic reduction allows us to calculate control strategies for fully and under-actuated vehicles via kinematic decoupled motion planning. However, this method has not yet been extended to account for external forces such as dissipative viscous drag and buoyancy induced potentials acting on a submerged vehicle. To fully bridge the gap between theory and application, this dissertation addresses the extension of this geometric control design method to include such forces. We incorporate the hydrodynamic drag experienced by the vehicle by modifying the Levi-Civita affine connection and demonstrate a method for the compensation of potential forces experienced during a prescribed motion. We present the design method for multiple different missions and include experimental results which validate both the extension of the theory and the ability to implement control strategies designed through the use of geometric techniques. By use of the extension presented in this dissertation, the underwater vehicle application successfully demonstrates the applicability of geometric methods to design implementable motion planning solutions for complex mechanical systems having equal or fewer input forces than available degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide another tool with which to further increase the autonomy of underwater vehicles.
    BibTeX:
    @phdthesis{Smith2008a,
      author = {Ryan N. Smith},
      title = {Geometric Control Theory and its Application to Underwater Vehicles},
      school = {University of Hawai`i at Manoa},
      year = {2008}
    }
    					
    Chyba2007 Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N. & Choi, S.K. Implementable efficient time and energy consumption trajectories design for an autonomous underwater vehicle 2007 Proceedings of the 6$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2007   inproceedings optimal control, control theory, autonomous underwater vehicle, ocean engineering
    Abstract: In this paper we consider the implementation of time and energy efficient trajectories onto a test-bed autonomous underwater vehicle. The trajectories are losely connected to the results of the application of the maximum principle to the controlled mechanical system. We use a numerical algorithm to compute efficient trajectories designed using geometric control theory to optimize a given cost function. Experimental results are shown for the time minimization problem.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2007,
      author = {Monique Chyba and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and Song K. Choi},
      title = {Implementable efficient time and energy consumption trajectories design for an autonomous underwater vehicle},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 6$^th$ International Conference on Computer Applications and Information Technology in the Maritime Industries, COMPIT 2007},
      year = {2007}
    }
    					
    Chyba2007a Chyba, M.; Choi, S.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N. & Weatherwax, S. Hydrodynamic and Thruster Model Validation for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles 2007 Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering , pp. 325-330   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory, ocean engineering
    Abstract: From Pontryagin's Maximum Principle to the Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex; we develop the theory and generate implementable time efficient trajectories for a test- bed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). This paper is the beginning of the journey from theory to implementation. We begin by considering pure motion trajectories and move into a rectangular trajectory which is a concatenation of pure surge and pure sway. These trajectories are tested using our numerical model and demonstrated by our AUV in the pool. In this paper we demonstrate that the above motions are realizable through our method, and we gain confidence in our numerical model. We conclude that using our current techniques, implementation of time efficient trajectories is likely to succeed.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2007a,
      author = {Monique Chyba and S.K. Choi and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and Scott Weatherwax},
      title = { Hydrodynamic and Thruster Model Validation for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering},
      year = {2007},
      pages = {325-330}
    }
    					
    Chyba2007b Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R. & Wilkens, G. AllgŁwer, F.; Fleming, P.; Kokotovic, P.; Kurzhanski, A.; Kwakernaak, H.; Rantzer, A.; Tsitsiklis, J.; Bullo, F. & Fujimoto, K. (Hrsg.) Controlling a Submerged Rigid Body: A Geometric Analysis 2007
    Vol. 366 Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Methods for Nonlinear Control 2006 , pp. 375-385  
    incollection differential geometry, autonomous underwater vehicle, control theory, ocean engineering
    Abstract: In this paper we analyze the equations of motion of a submerged rigid body. Our motivation is based on recent developments done in trajectory design for this problem. Our goal is to relate some properties of singular extremals to the existence of decoupling vector fields. The ideas displayed in this paper can be viewed as a starting point to a geometric formulation of the trajectory design problem for mechanical systems with potential and external forces.
    BibTeX:
    @incollection{Chyba2007b,
      author = {Chyba, Monique and Haberkorn, Thomas and Smith, Ryan and Wilkens, George},
      title = {Controlling a Submerged Rigid Body: A Geometric Analysis},
      booktitle = {Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Methods for Nonlinear Control 2006},
      publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
      year = {2007},
      volume = {366},
      pages = {375-385},
      url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-73890-9_30}
    }
    					
    Chyba2006a Chyba, M.; Choi, S.; Haberkorn, T.; Smith, R.N. & Zhao, S. Towards Practical Implementation of Time Optimal Trajectories for Underwater Vehicles 2006 Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering , pp. 183-190   inproceedings autonomous underwater vehicle, optimal control, ocean engineering
    Abstract: In this paper, we are concerned with the practical implementation of time optimal numerical techniques on underwater vehicles. We briefly introduce the model of underwater vehicle we consider and present the parameters for the test bed ODIN (Omni-Directional Intelligent Navigator). Then we explain the numerical method used to obtain time optimal trajectories with a structure suitable for the implementation. We follow this with a discussion on the modifications to be made considering the characteristics of ODIN. Finally, we illustrate our computations with some experimental results.
    BibTeX:
    @inproceedings{Chyba2006a,
      author = {Monique Chyba and S.K. Choi and Thomas Haberkorn and Ryan N. Smith and Side Zhao},
      title = {Towards Practical Implementation of Time Optimal Trajectories for Underwater Vehicles},
      booktitle = {Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering},
      year = {2006},
      pages = {183-190}
    }
    					

    Created by JabRef on 25/10/2014.