Publication Detail

Evaluating Network Rigidity in Realistic Systems: Decentralization, Asynchronicity, and Parallelization

Ryan K. Williams, Andrea Gasparri, Attilio Priolo and Gaurav S. Sukhatme

Citation

Ryan K. Williams, Andrea Gasparri, Attilio Priolo and Gaurav S. Sukhatme. "Evaluating Network Rigidity in Realistic Systems: Decentralization, Asynchronicity, and Parallelization". In IEEE Transactions on Robotics, DOI: 10.1109/TRO.2014.2315713, 2014.

Abstract

In this paper, we consider the problem of evaluating the rigidity of a planar network, while satisfying common objectives of real-world systems: decentralization, asynchronicity, and parallelization. Motivating our investigation are the implications that rigidity has in fundamental multi-robot problems, e.g. guaranteed formation stability and relative localizability. We propose the decentralization of the pebble game algorithm of Jacobs et. al., an O(n^2) method that determines the generic rigidity of a planar network. Our decentralization is based on asynchronous inter-agent message-passing and a distributed memory architecture, coupled with distributed auctions for electing network leaders to arbitrate evaluation. Further, we provide a parallelization of our methods that takes inspiration from gossip algorithms to yield significantly reduced execution time and messaging burden. A thorough analysis of the correctness, finite termination, and complexity of our propositions is given, along with a simulated application in decentralized rigidity control. Finally, we provide Monte Carlo analysis of our algorithms in a Contiki networking environment, illustrating the real-world applicability of our methods, and yielding a bridge between rigidity theory and realistic interacting systems.

Files

Manuscript (.pdf)

This video demonstrates the application of our decentralized rigidity evaluation to the control of a mobile multi-robot team. Specifically, we assume that each of n = 7 mobile robots employs the constrained interaction framework (see Williams:TRO:2013) to allow for spatial topology control, specifically such that rigidity can be dynamically regulated. The robots are initialized in a highly connected configuration and apply a common dispersive control law to force link deletions, retaining only those links computed by application of the decentralized pebble game (red). When a minimally rigid network is reached, the robots enter into a path following phase that intersects the formation with a stationary obstacle. The obstacle forces the formation to split for passage, resulting in a non-rigid configuration. With only a rigidity maintenance control, the possibility of obstacle navigation is uncertain, and the non-rigidity after obstacle avoidance is undetectable. However, the proposed decentralized rigidity test allows the network to detect the non-rigidity and initiate a recovery maneuver, in this case an aggregative control that forces link additions. After rigidity is recovered, a dispersive control is reapplied to reach a minimally rigid network and continue path following.

This video demonstrates the application of our decentralized rigidity evaluation to the control of a mobile multi-robot team. Specifically, we assume a system of n = 7 mobile robots, each applying a standard dispersive control to force link deletion in the network. When an equilibrium position is reached, the network graph (rigid by control) is used to define a target formation, and the objective is switched to a formation keeping controller. As rigidity is a sufficient condition for formation stability, such a composite objective can be seen as growing rigid formations, in a dynamic and distributed way (contrasting with centralized and static methods in the literature), integrating adaptability with standard formation control techniques.