Publication Detail

Evaluation Of A Tri-axial, Gyroscope-enhanced, And Bluetooth-enabled Accelerometer In Estimating Walking Speeds

Harshvardhan Vathsangam, Adar Emken, Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Donna Spruijt-Metz

Citation

Harshvardhan Vathsangam, Adar Emken, Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Donna Spruijt-Metz. "Evaluation Of A Tri-axial, Gyroscope-enhanced, And Bluetooth-enabled Accelerometer In Estimating Walking Speeds". Poster paper in ACSM American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting (ACSM), 42 Supplement, 479, May 2010. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Abstract

Obesity treatment and prevention in youth is challenging. Thus, we are developing the KNOWME Network, a suite of wearable, Bluetooth-enabled wireless devices for monitoring obesity-related behaviors in minority youth. Here we present the Bluetooth-enabled Accelerometer (BEA), developed to address a lack of Bluetooth-enabled, research-quality accelerometers. The BEA provides information about body movement and orientation using an accelerometer and gyroscope combination that interfaces directly with a mobile phone/computer in real time. The accuracy of BEA-based models was assessed by estimating walking speed. Purpose: To develop personalized models for estimating treadmill walking speed using the BEA. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female; age 35 ± 12) walked at 7 speeds ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 miles per hour (mph) for 5 minutes per speed while wearing the BEA on the right hip. The BEA recorded motion information with a tri-axial accelerometer and tri-axial gyroscope and transmitted it via Bluetooth to a computer. Ground truth was the displayed treadmill speed. Relevant features were extracted using Fourier transforms on windowed segments for each of the six time series. A Gaussian Process-based non-linear regression model was trained on the extracted features and ground truth speed. A percentage of data points from each subject’s training session were randomly sampled and used to train parametric and non-parametric personalized models. These models were used to predict speeds from unseen data points of the same subject. Results: RMS prediction error was reduced with an increase in training data percentage up to 50%. At 50% data points used, walking speeds could be estimated with an average RMS error of .057 ± 0.016 mph (maximum RMS error 0.078) using Gaussian Process-based non-linear models. This error was less than that found by least squares-based linear regression with smaller variance in errors (.091 ± .061 mph). The BEA reliably transmitted data up to 30 feet away. Conclusion: Data from the BEA with Gaussian Process-regression can estimate walking speed with higher accuracy and precision than linear regression based approaches and could potentially contribute to accurate physical activity detection in KNOWME Networks. Future studies are needed to evaluate the BEA in free-living conditions.

Keywords

Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Gaussian process regression